The Apple launch affair was a stellar one. From highlighting the slimmer and taller design of iPhone’s latest variant to showcasing the new iOS6, it seemed like Apple had the structure and resources in place to prove all its doubters wrong. But a couple of weeks after its official launch, Apple looks like treading shores unknown.

What was essentially supposed to be the Big Debate between iPhone 5 and Samsung Galaxy S3 has been overshadowed by unified claims of a failed product launch in the form of iOS 6 Maps. In coming out with the iPhone 5, Apple decided to completely ward off with YouTube and Google Maps; two of the most popular app services amongst Smartphone users. And in came the all new iOS maps which have been developed from the ground up (legitimate spokesperson quote).

During the official keynote, the crowd was given a firsthand look at how the Maps service on iOS works. The vector-based map system has the benefits of Local Search for getting photos and reviews of places they are about to visit. Apart from the standard turn by turn navigation and reroutes integrated with Siri, the Maps have been made capable of making your drives easier and time-saving. Another wonderful feature within the iOS maps was it “Flyover” feature, wherein you can actually see a live time human eye image of how places look like while flying over them and also allows you to adjust viewing distances and angles as per your convenience.

Now anyone who would have watched the keynote would have no doubt been left impressed the strategic innovation and enterprise on Apple’s part for the Mapping system. But the actual live use of this app has given less than impressive results. Users have used various social mediums with images showing glaring defects in the service. From poor route suggestions to obscure satellite imagery, mismarked and mislabeled places to obliterated building and structures, the iOS maps have left a lot to be desired. Various technology experts have been eager to highlight that Apple on its part had pre-meditated the reaction the service would get and expects to rapidly improve the mapping with the user inputs it get. As bold as the move looks, it jeopardizes Apple’s stance of being oblivious to safeguarding user interest.

 

 

Now taking things into context, this is a short term risk Apple is willing to take for long term benefit of its users. And their engaging approach of constant improvement through real time user data is also commendable. But as I see it, maybe Apple would have been better off releasing their Maps service app with the next update on iOS6. That way, they would have been able to improve on an already worthy alternate option to Google Maps and gather more concrete data to avoid the widespread glitches in iOS maps is facing at the moment. By rushing into replacing a Mapping service which has proven to be reliable worldwide with a half-baked mapping and navigation service which is still in its nascent stage has put Apple in the face of risking wrath of its loyal yet massive consumer base.

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