Being more of a technologically knowledgeable girl in the group, most guys in our college group were fond of me. Even though the whole group used to hang out together, I was more engaged in multiplayer split screen PS2 gaming with the guys rather than gossiping with the girls. And the two favorites at the time were “Counter Strike” and “Left 4 Dead”. So much were we engrossed in these multiplayer games in split screen mode that our parents have had many a sleepless nights.

Without belittling the Split Screen technology, it is compromisingly manageable at best. No denying the late night virtual raids were enjoyable to be a part of, the four divisions on a 32” screen used to confuse us with everyone losing track of which screen his player was in as well increased the scope of cheating in a versus mode game mainly the racing titles. Sony’s Simulview display for full-screen multiplayer gaming looked a decent step in that direction but it turned out to be damp squid with a meagre 24” screen size. And since it would have costed a lot at that time, even the richest brat in the group went against spending the moolah on it.

Fast forward 6 years, and LG has taken full advantage of the untapped avenue and developed a pretty similar technology which goes by the name of “Dual Play”. And unlike the screen restrictions in Sony’s display, the Dual Play feature is ubiquitous in all the models of 2012 LG Cinema 3D range. The tact of making Dual Play lies in putting two same-side lenses within a Glass Frame so that you view only a particular side or in other terms tricking your brain via your eyes only to perceive the view of a single side through same-sided polarized lenses. That way, you get a full screen view of your vehicle/player without interfering with the other person’s game play. Mind you, this feature is still in its progressive stage and limited to only two players but I fully expect LG to expand the horizon for up to four distinct players at the same time. The other minor drawback is a little loss to the screen resolution as basically one part of the screen is being stretched over the whole TV frame.  Although you won’t face any such resolution loss issue on LG’s 4K UD 3D TV.

And it looks like this seems to have woken up the Japanese giants to bring the Simulview in a much larger 84” 4K screen with the launch of their KD84X9005 4K TV. Much more than competition, it is good that the major players are getting serious about the next phase of multiplayer console gaming. The only major drawback of this screen size would be the cost factor which puts it out of reach of the majority of people.

And yes, as a potential consumer, you will be right to complain about the exorbitance of 4K prices which make these technologies perform with resolution losses. But from a long term perspective, companies are right to bring the bigger screen sizes now so that the downscaling is cost effective I the future. As it stands, companies like LG and Sony have the groundwork in place and as soon as 4K’s become affordable, one will be able to enjoy full screen multiplayer gaming in its HD glory!

Advertisements